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  1. #21
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    Jun 2012
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    Hello, i started home dialysis pd 10 months ago and since i am a diabetic my sugars soared sky high so my endocrinologist started me on another insulin and i have gained 60 pounds from all the extra insulin. I am miserable and uncomfortable because of this. I was told it was impossible to lose weight and tat i would just have to learn to live with it. I am thinking of switching to hemodyalisis instead of pd to try and lose weight this way since hemo is not full of sugar. Any suggestions from anyone ...i am really losing it.

  2. #22
    Senior Member
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    Feb 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by toosweet View Post
    Hello, i started home dialysis pd 10 months ago and since i am a diabetic my sugars soared sky high so my endocrinologist started me on another insulin and i have gained 60 pounds from all the extra insulin. I am miserable and uncomfortable because of this. I was told it was impossible to lose weight and tat i would just have to learn to live with it. I am thinking of switching to hemodyalisis instead of pd to try and lose weight this way since hemo is not full of sugar. Any suggestions from anyone ...i am really losing it.
    Hi Toosweet,
    I'm so sorry you're getting frustrating and thinking of doing Hemo.
    Has your Endo checked your thyroid (I'm sure he/she has since that's their specialty.
    I used Humolog and Lantus, but didn't have the weight gain problem at all.

    Are you less active now that you're on PD?

    There is one PD solution many centers are using now. The solution is called Extraneal (icodextrin).
    This solution is used for patients who are high transporters and/or diabetics.
    Extraneal is made from a starch instead of Dextrose, it doesn't increase BG's like regular PD solution does.
    You might want to discuss this solution with Neph and PD nurse.

    Take care
    I received the GIFT OF LIFE on Nov 9, 2010 thanks to my wonderful donor Laura and her family!

  3. #23
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    Jun 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by goudrea View Post
    Doctor says PD is better for an active traveller.
    Right now the dialysis is 'catheter' hemo...not yet ready for such an awful diagnosis. It takes time to adapt and the choice between PD and HD is quite difficult to take.
    Any suggestions.
    Can't imagine science hasn't évolved and it's still necessary to have a huge belly. Boy we go on the moon!

    thanks
    Here's basically a full education to help you make an informed decision. Personally, as someone who has experienced in-center hemodialysis from late August 2011-early May 2013 I suggest PD. By my second day on PD I had much more energy and much less pain. I am young with a strong constitution yet I had begun to deteriorate on in-center hemodialysis and now since I finally made the decision to switch I feel a lot better. I have yet to try the cycler aka CCPD, since I'm still pretty new to PD. My center always likes to start the patients off on CAPD aka manual PD. I still doing the manuals until a little later this month. However, it seems many patients do well on the cycler too. PD doesnt seem to be as hard on the body and is more natural, more like what your kidneys would be doing if they were working correctly. But listen to your nurses when you get trained should you chose this route and be clean to guard against infection, since thats the biggest risk with PD. Even if you do PD its still a good idea to get a hemodialysis fistula or graft, unless both surgeries wouldnt be worth it, say if you will be gettting a transplant very, very soon. The reason for it being a good idea is because if something happened to your PD catheter then you'd still have a back-up (and if say you got a hemo-catheter placed real quickly in an emergency, without the time needed to wait for a graft or fistula to heal, the hemo-catheters are particulary infection prone, much more than the PD ones. They are constantly getting infected!). Another option is home hemodialysis and many centers now offer it. It is more gentle than in-center hemodialysis. However, you have to devote usually 3 hours at a time 6-7 days a week to being on the machine (but in the comfort of your home at least). You will need to get button hole technique (may wish to google it) done on your fistula, if you get one of those. A down-side is you will have to have an assistant, like a family member or friend, get trained on it and dedicate themselves to being there with you each time you are on the home-hemo, incase of emergency. With PD usually about the first month or so can be difficult because every 4 hours or so you have to do a fluid exchange, after around that amount of time you can get a machine called the cycler. You can hook up to the cycler after a little set up each night while you sleep and it will do the exchanges for you automatically in the comfort of your home, no assistant required. The infection risk is greater than hemodialysis using a graft or especially a fistula, but most infections can be avoided, and should one occur you will be trained on what to do right away and what to watch for by your nurses. From the point of view of a person whose had a blood stream infection due to an infected hemodialysis catheter I would say if you do get infected and attend to the infection right away-theres some good medications available. ~Best to you with all of this~

  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by goudrea View Post
    Doctor says PD is better for an active traveller.
    Right now the dialysis is 'catheter' hemo...not yet ready for such an awful diagnosis. It takes time to adapt and the choice between PD and HD is quite difficult to take.
    Any suggestions.
    Can't imagine science hasn't évolved and it's still necessary to have a huge belly. Boy we go on the moon!

    thanks
    Here's basically an in-dept education to help you make and informed choice. Personally, as someone who has experienced in-center hemodialysis from late August 2011-early May 2013 I suggest PD. By my second day on PD I had much more energy and much less pain. I am young with a strong constitution yet I had begun to deteriorate on in-center hemodialysis and now since I finally made the decision to switch I feel a lot better. I have yet to try the cycler aka CCPD, since I'm still pretty new to PD. My center always likes to start the patients off on CAPD aka manual PD. I still doing the manuals until a little later this month. However, it seems many patients do well on the cycler too. PD doesnt seem to be as hard on the body and is more natural, more like what your kidneys would be doing if they were working correctly. But listen to your nurses when you get trained should you chose this route and be clean to guard against infection, since thats the biggest risk with PD. Even if you do PD its still a good idea to get a hemodialysis fistula or graft, unless both surgeries wouldnt be worth it, say if you will be gettting a transplant very, very soon. The reason for it being a good idea is because if something happened to your PD catheter then you'd still have a back-up (and if say you got a hemo-catheter placed real quickly in an emergency, without the time needed to wait for a graft or fistula to heal, the hemo-catheters are particulary infection prone, much more than the PD ones. They are constantly getting infected!). Another option is home hemodialysis and many centers now offer it. It is more gentle than in-center hemodialysis. However, you have to devote usually 3 hours at a time 6-7 days a week to being on the machine (but in the comfort of your home at least). You will need to get button hole technique (may wish to google it) done on your fistula, if you get one of those. A down-side is you will have to have an assistant, like a family member or friend, get trained on it and dedicate themselves to being there with you each time you are on the home-hemo, incase of emergency. With PD usually about the first month or so can be difficult because every 4 hours or so you have to do a fluid exchange, after around that amount of time you can get a machine called the cycler. You can hook up to the cycler after a little set up each night while you sleep and it will do the exchanges for you automatically in the comfort of your home, no assistant required. The infection risk is greater than hemodialysis using a graft or especially a fistula, but most infections can be avoided, and should one occur you will be trained on what to do right away and what to watch for by your nurses. From the point of view of a person whose had a blood stream infection due to an infected hemodialysis catheter I would say if you do get infected and attend to the infection right away-theres some good medications available. ~Best to you with all of this~

  5. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    44
    One thing you'll realize from reading over the posts is that PD affects everyone a bit differently. I'm not a big person (140 lbs) so I use a smaller bag (1500ml) which may be an option if you're uncomfortable with the 2litre bag. But your doctor has the best advice on that one. As far as being bloated..yup, that's gonna happen when you pour 2 litres of liquid into your abdomen! Just learn to love those stretchy pants.

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