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Thread: Pasta Sauce

  1. #1
    Sharon123
    Guest

    Question Pasta Sauce

    My mother is new to dialysis.I will be cooking most of her meals.
    She enjoys pasta very much,but now that tomatoes are pretty much taboo,I am at a loss as to what kind of sauces (not too spicey) I can put on her pasta.
    Any ideas (recipes)would be a great help. Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    164
    "Spaghetti Sauce" as you know it may be a little different now, but there are still several very good options for pasta.

    Our family really likes melted butter and garlic, and that's fine for dialysis patients.

    We also like to saute garlic and onions in olive oil, then add green and/or red peppers and then ground beef or turkey. That's fine for dialysis patients, too. You can add red chili powder and paprika to help give your 'sauce' the red color you are accustomed to. Of course you could also add oregano, basil and/or a bay leaf, a little water, and simmer the sauce.

    You can also make a 'white sauce' using cream cheese and non-dairy creamer. You could add 'allowed' vegetables to it to make a 'pasta primavera' dish. A tiny bit of parmesan cheese would be fine (as would a 'tiny bit' of red sauce to the recipe above). You just have to exercise control and use moderation.

    You can also check the renal diet cookbooks available for other pasta recipes.

    Pasta salad is another option -- with "italian-style" dressing and vegetables, or as a mayo-based pasta dish.

    Good luck -- and if you end up creating something unique and great, be sure to share it with our forum!
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    The response of this moderator is not an attempt to address a specific condition. Please note that the DaVita.com discussion forums do not provide medical advice or professional opinions about specific conditions. The purpose of the discussion forums is to provide an opportunity for individuals to discuss end stage renal disease and related topics. The discussion forms are not a substitute for professional medical care. For questions or

  3. #3
    Sharon123
    Guest

    Thanks

    Thanks for the great pasta sauce ideas.
    This renal diet is all so new to us.
    Another major problem I see for my mom and I as soon as she gets home (she has been in the hospital and rehab since b4 she started dialysis,so we have not been on our own yet.)Fluid restrictions! I assume that is a huge issue for all dialysis patients.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    164
    Yes, fluid intake is a challenge but there are many great fluid control ideas.

    It's important to note that foods high in sodium (salt) will increase thirst, and so will poor glucose (blood sugar) control in people with diabetes. So to start off, it's important to address those areas by being aware of salty food sources and good blood sugar control tips.

    From here on, I've done the "cut and paste" from a previous posting on fluid that I did a while back. Read on for more fluid control ideas. Keep in mind that these are general tips and that we cannot address individual patient issues as we don't have individual specific patient history and health information. But these are general suggestions for dialysis patients needing to control fluid intake.

    Foods high in sodium are salt (and 'seasoned salts' like garlic salt and onion salt), foods that are cured, smoked or salted (like ham, bacon, and sausage), foods in a brine (like pickles, olives, and sauerkraut), and foods you see the salt on (like pretzels, crackers and chips). Limiting or omitting these will help control thirst. Many processed or 'boxed' foods and many 'fast foods' are also high in sodium.

    In general, it's often recommended to try to keep fluid intake to about a quart (or 32 oz) per day. This can be done by using some of the techniques you have already offered. Another tip is to use a quart jug (or mark off 32 oz in an old 2-litre soda bottle), and fill it with 32 oz of water. Every time you drink something, pour out that same amount of water. (if you have coffee in the am, pour water into that mug or cup and dump it out, then continue throughout the day as you drink). This way, you can visualize the amount of fluid you are consuming. It's a good idea to do this every once in a while to see what you are actually taking in. If you don't know your personal fluid allottment, ask your physician or the dietitian at your dialysis center.

    Adding lemon to your ice cubes may help (but you'll want to let your ice cubes melt so you can determine how much fluid you are getting from them). Using a "spray bottle" with water and a little mouth wash might also help. You can "spray" before and/or after you drink to help limit the fluid. Try freezing grapes or blueberries (but remember your potassium limit), and use them instead of ice cubes -- they'll have less fluid than an ice cube. Chew gum, suck on lemons, eat a spoonful of icy-cold applesauce, or try some cold jelly on bread. I know these last few suggestions aren't the same as drinking, but they're worth trying. You can also freeze the "pretend" ice cubes and suck on those for a cooling effect without taking in any fluid.

    So, we hope these ideas help somewhat. We're heading into the "hot out there" season in some parts of the world, and it's great that you're trying to prepare for it. Best wishes.

    (end of 'cut and paste' from previous post).

    So -- best wishes again. It's really great that you're preparing ahead to help your family adhere to the recommendations for health.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    The response of this moderator is not an attempt to address a specific condition. Please note that the DaVita.com discussion forums do not provide medical advice or professional opinions about specific conditions. The purpose of the discussion forums is to provide an opportunity for individuals to discuss end stage renal disease and related topics. The discussion forms are not a substitute for professional medical care. For questions or

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    567

    Talking

    All the sauce suggestions so far are really good.
    But I don't think having 1 small serving or Real tomato sauce once in a while will kill you.
    I know u r allowed to have a few slices of tomato once in a while as you can not avoid every single thing that has potassium in it.

    I personally eat 1/2 a pineappple every week, 1 cup strawberries and some tomatoes and eggplant sometimes and have never had any potassium problems.
    I also drink 1 liter of orange juice every week!

    ....but you would have to know what your numbers are before eating anything "bad" I guess.
    I seem to have problems absorbing all my food and vitamins??

    As for "refreshing" stuff try the kids ice water posicles.
    you can buy some that come in plastic tubes and cost $1 or 2- they are very small and about 20ml fluid per posicle.
    they have sugar one and sugar free ones thesedays.

    or those posicles on a wooden stick. alot of the ice water ones are only 75ml!
    you can also get sugar free ones too.

    if you can't find any, why not make your own "mini" ice cubes with flavored cristal light and small wooden sticks...would pe really cheap and pretty tasty!

    you could probably eat a whole tray of flavored ice cubes every day or 2 without any problems...exept the very cold mouth!

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