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  1. #1
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    Feb 2013
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    feeling overwhelmed

    hi. My husband has been on hemo dialysis since feb 2013 and we are about to begin training for in-home dialysis. I am nervous that I will not be able to learn everything I need to learn as quickly as I need to learn it so that he can home dialyze. I am also concerned that he is still having trouble with his fistula......needles dont always go in.....infiltration....has to use cath again.....wait for arm to heal...its all so overwhelming. I think this all worries him as well, and he gets depressed very easily. Anyone has/is going through this, have any suggestions for me???

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Jul 2012
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    I have just started HD in center and plan to home dialyze. After a week of two failed first day attempts and infiltration with bruised arm, I am nervous about doing this. My husband said, to encourage me, that there is three months before we have to worry about it. I am sure your husband if feeling like me... nervous too.
    But...I am still ready and willing for that time to come. I want to make sure I can still travel and swim and have a life style that is mine. Your husband probably feels this way too and is willing to go through this with you. My husband is very supportive and he is willing to help just like you. I am sure he feels like you since he is also inexperienced in medical procedures. When I had MRSA he did the procedure after the nurses taught him what was needed and did a fantastic job. No recurrence in over 5 years and I am clear of that problem because he cared and took time to do everything he was taught. I believe he will do just as well with this as I am sure you will too. You just need to be encouraged and do this as a student learning a new job.
    I have a great faith in God and know that when the time comes for me to change to home HD, that we will have the strength to do this as a team. God, my husband and I. Have a good day. Remember we are never too old to learn something new and it just take practice and patience to do it right. This known comes from being a retired teacher and still learning new things everyday.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2013
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    Thank you so much for the words of encouragement! They mean a lot. I know I can do this...it's just scarey. My husband is in same position...wants to travel, and swim, we have a pool and he could not swim this summer and that did not help. So, I feel as your husband, I will do whatever it takes to help him to have the most productive life possible. I am also trying to become a donor for him to get a kidney. I need to lose about 40 pounds....which is also overwhelming...but Im doing it...slowly. Thank you again for the words of encouragement, and best of luck to you and your husband, hope to chat with you again on this site!

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    Nov 2013
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    1
    I completely understand what you are going through. I am taking care of my 33 year old sister who is on dialysis 3x week and just had fistula put in. She is also a type 1 diabetic. I feel like I am having as many bad days as she is at this point. She is also depressed, has drop foot and could lose a few toes in the near future. This is very overwhelming and to watch it daily is even harder.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2013
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    So I guess im safe to say I am Scared and depressed Im 34 and do dialysis 3x week caused from diabetes. Currently on transplant list some days just get me down worse than others!! trying to hold down a full time job and single mom and dialysis gets tough :-( I do have my mom who helps me with me with my son.. I just want to say thank you and for all those people who are helping out there loved ones it means more than you will ever know!!!!!!

  6. #6
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2013
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    Dear helpless You are amazing and I thank you for being there for your sister!!!

  7. #7
    Member
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    Feb 2013
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    63
    Hi Christyrotter,

    I am 43, a sinlge mother too anf just had a transplant on July 16th. I know how very hard all of this is and I am so glad you have your mother to help. It really can be very hard some days and I want you to know you are not alone. Just remember that you are on the list and there is light at the end of the tunnel. Just invision the freedom you will have and extra time with your son after the transplant! This is what got me through the tough days. Now, that I have recived this fabulous gift, I DO enjoy every moment with my son and thank god I am here to enjoy every second of his life.

    Please write any time! We are here for you & I check in almost every day! YES, I still need my friends here and thank god for all of them!!!

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    86
    Home-hemo take the concerted effort of the two people. The patient should understand, that the insertion of needles hurts sometimes. bThe caregiver needs to be willing to set up the machine and tear it down. Travel can still take place, it does have to be planned. You have to have the number for net stage readily available in case you run into a problem. They can help you with most any problem.
    I have been on Home-hemo now for three years and dializing at home does have its benefits you can keep heated blankets,and neck heat along with a heating pad. This is not always avaiialble in center. Your husband should do very well o hoe-hemo, I really appreciate my caregivers as they are very diligent about pressures. This is not proffessional advice, but one who knew nothing going in and was taught this by the nurses. Best of luck. I will pray for you,Kamargo 294. Hoofpkr

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2008
    Posts
    410
    I went from fainting and usually having fear induced seizures everytime anybody had any type of medical procedure at all, even just taking blood pressure or giving a shot...... to successfully doing home hemo with my husband 4-5 days a week. I did not stick him, he stuck himself but I did everything else and I was there the whole time. You can do it!!! The first day in training for home hemo (which by the way was the first day he dialized ever) I had to leave the room. Instead of fainting or having a seizure I started crying. Because I was not there for him when he was so scared. I toughened up and walked back in and have been standing tall by his side ever since. You CAN do it. Just do it!

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    265
    The human spirit is quite resilient as evidenced by the preceding posts. You never know what you will be able to do until you are placed in the situation. Assimilating all of the challenges of hemodialysis, especially home hemodialysis is no exception. When you begin training, you are not expected to have any prior knowledge or training and yet when you successfully complete the training, you are competent to perform hemodialysis treatments in the comfort of your own home with competent medical staff only a phone call away.

    I've been conducting HHD since begining training in mid July 2012 and at home since early September 2012. My care partner/spouse and I have established a firm division of labor where I set up the NxStage System 1 cycler, lay out my treatment supplies, cannulate the button hole access (two of five developed) sites, connect the blood lines and conduct the treatment, and she pulls my second needle at the end of treatment and strips and cleans the cycler while I hold pressure on my sites. We both manage the inventory from NxStage and my HHD clinic, though she counts the inventory and I focus on restocking supplies from bulk storage to our dialysis room where we keep 1 to 3 weeks worth of supplies.

    We were and are committed to the HHD modality and in doing so 5X weekly, we have gotten quite proficient in the required tasks. It amounts to a 20 hours per week part time job that you must work. There are no vacation days or sick days only the 2 days a week where we won't do a treatment. When I've traveled for business and treated in local DaVita clinics, my care partner gets a break, otherwise it's in our daily and weekly schedule to stay for the duration. Our reward is my continued good health and with it the capabilty to work a demanding full time job and pursue otherwise active lives.

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