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  1. #11
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    To echo and add to dac0214's post remarks, kidney transplantation seems the preferred modality for the youth of the CKD population, and for good reason. They are generally healthier and more active and have a lot more living to do that would be markedly burdened by dialysis of any form. The unfortunate reality is that donated kidneys - live or cadaver have limited lives, which leads the recipient back to some form of dialysis and listing for another transplant.

    Each transplanted kidney you receive brings the body's potential development of new antibodies, making futher matching and/or managment through anti-rejection drugs all the more challenging. Certainly all kidney transplant recipients are eternally greatful for the gift, and the personal freedom that it provides.

    It has to be quite mentally challenging to face the failure of a transplanted kidney, and to then re-start dialysis and manage the challenges that it presents. To grow old and pass away from causes unrelated to a successfully transplanted kidney is a most desireable fate, but also one that is rather unlikely. As a result, becoming competent and comfortable with dialysis seems our only recourse until medical science can provide us with a drug to restore our normal kidney function or an artificial kidney or natural kidney that will not require anti-rejection drugs and will last the remainder of our natural lives.

  2. #12
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    Mar 2013
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    i also am due to go for my 1st consult next week.. i got the booklet yesterday and freaked about the immunosuppressant drug side effects.. i don't want to live an extra 5 yrs. if i'm going to be that sick..i was only diagnosed with esrd 5 months ago, doing dialysis 3 times a week.. i'm so uncertain.. help!!

  3. #13
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    Mar 2013
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    p.s. i am a 46 yr old female, healthy in every other way(cardiac, liver, mammogram, etc) have had and passed all of the tests with flying colors.. wonder if that will help with the side effects

  4. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Hello, I am 52 years old and had a transplant 10 months ago. It was an experience but am doing well. I was wondering does anyone have sleeping problems

  5. #15
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2013
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    I'm addressing this to "Dripper";
    Your question(s) at the top of this forum can vary depending on your age, work, kids, grandkids, family, donor, faith, etc.
    Let me start with myself, and why I responded to the this forum. I'm going on 10 years with a cadaver kidney. My mom was set up and on stand-by, when emotionally I could not take her kidney or do this to my mom. I had a kidney on the waiting list - so I accepted that. I drove 2 hrs into California, to tell my mom the news and share my heart. It was an emotional time for me. My wife also wanted to donate her kidney. I was told by my Nephrologist that our two young boys could have Alports Syndrome - so I told my wife she really needs to "save" her kidney in the event one of our boys should get this disease. (they are 18 and 20 with NO side effects!)

    Yes - at times it gets old reloading the pill box every week, but nothing like going on dialysis every other day. I canít imagine living on dialysis, as I had (have) a family, and was also eager to get back to work (I'm now a Maintenance Supervisor with 6 people under me). I used to bump my transplanted kidney at work. This reminded me of the transplant on a daily basis. The UCSF Nephrologist did mention to me "you are not normal anymore"...that hurt for awhile, but soon realized I am not really normal. I now have Quarterly lab work and follow up visits. USFC calls this kidney "their kidney". (I go to USFC on a yearly follow up) All aside, this is still much better than Dialysis.

    Back to the "Pill-Box". There was an abundance of meds initially (USFC used a fishing tackle box to store them.) During the first few weeks of the transplant, those meds started disappearing as time went on. I'm still on Cellcept, Prograf, and (small dosage of Prednisone). Along with Allopurinol, Cozaar and Uroxatral...plus a few others (for side effects). I'm asked to see a Dermatologist on a yearly basis due to side effects) But again; this keeps me more mobile in the world than Dialysis. By The Way; I was on Dialysis not more than 6 weeks. (I firmly believe it was a God thing!) I nearly got sent home after USFC found out I was only on dialysis for only 6 weeks.

    My Energy level is beyond others. I like staying active. My wife and I built a Tri-level house (just before the transplant) We both (still at our age) wake-board and slalom ski. I also bare-foot water ski off the boom. (Yes I'm in the sun - but one also has to live and enjoy this short "vapor in the wind").
    I plan on retiring soon and owning my own business afterwards.
    I would never have the mobility I have now - doing dialysis.

    Dripper there are NO regrets. Would I do it again (even at the age of 53) YES - YES and YES! I'm very confident about this transplant. So confident, that after our two Biological boys have moved out - my wife and I are in the process of adopting a sibling group of 3. If God can give me a second chance on life, why not have a chance to give back to others. We now have Steve (11) Sharon (13) and Will (17) living with us! Sometimes I'd rather go through another transplant then what Iím dealing with regarding these kids! But at the end of the day, there are Rewards that one see's, that makes BOTH experiences in my life well - worth my time!
    Sincerely
    "Dad"

  6. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    7
    Thanks to all for your insightful feedback!

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    11
    Chuyjess wins the award for best answer! lol
    I just had my Tx last Thursday. I was in the hospital for 3 days. I will admit I felt better afterwards but I think I tried to do too much too soon, as I'm now more sore than I was right after the surgery. Even though there are a lot of meds to take, it still feels surreal to not have to take binders all day, etc.
    i

  8. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by BryanSaysWhat View Post
    Chuyjess wins the award for best answer! lol
    I just had my Tx last Thursday. I was in the hospital for 3 days. I will admit I felt better afterwards but I think I tried to do too much too soon, as I'm now more sore than I was right after the surgery. Even though there are a lot of meds to take, it still feels surreal to not have to take binders all day, etc.
    i
    Congrats Bryan! I had mine 4 months age and I know how you feel. You will be sore for at least two months, but it will get better each day. I found walking daily really helped. PLEASE though, do take it easy and listen to them about lifting more than 10 lbs, etc. The last thing you need is to get a hernia (sp?). Anyways, I went back to work full time after 9 weeks and have been doing really well. Just rest when tired and take things slowly.

    Best of luck!!!!!

  9. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1
    RE: To echo and add to dac0214's post remarks, kidney transplantation seems the preferred modality for the youth of the CKD population, and for good reason. They are generally healthier and more active and have a lot more living to do that would be markedly burdened by dialysis of any form. The unfortunate reality is that donated kidneys - live or cadaver have limited lives, which leads the recipient back to some form of dialysis and listing for another transplant.

    Each transplanted kidney you receive brings the body's potential development of new antibodies, making futher matching and/or managment through anti-rejection drugs all the more challenging. Certainly all kidney transplant recipients are eternally greatful for the gift, and the personal freedom that it provides.

    It has to be quite mentally challenging to face the failure of a transplanted kidney, and to then re-start dialysis and manage the challenges that it presents. To grow old and pass away from causes unrelated to a successfully transplanted kidney is a most desireable fate, but also one that is rather unlikely. As a result, becoming competent and comfortable with dialysis seems our only recourse until medical science can provide us with a drug to restore our normal kidney function or an artificial kidney or natural kidney that will not require anti-rejection drugs and will last the remainder of our natural lives.




    I agree with what you have said. My dad received a transplant last spring and it failed soon after. He had to go back on dialysis and became severely depressed. He always hated the fact of being on dialysis the rest of his life. Now he is in hospice care. Unless there is a miracle like maybe the transplanted kidney will finally wake up on its own then there is no chance for survival. The peritoneal dialysis and even hemodialysis will not do any good at this point due to his frail state. He is 74 years old and I hope he can at least make it through Christmas time. Our only hope is a Christmas miracle if it is God's will but if not, then I certainly don't want to see him suffer any longer.
    Last edited by WillieB74; 11-15-2013 at 08:51 AM.

  10. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    10
    A little late to this party, but I will say that for me, transplantation has always been a world of difference. I'm actually on my fourth transplant and I'm being evaluated for a fifth. And while I will not say it is easy - particularly the first year post-transplant - I will say that most transplant recipients I've talked to say they get used to the routine of living with the transplanted organ pretty quickly. The first year is all about healing from the surgery, getting back in shape, getting the meds down to maintenance dosages, and doing a bunch of checkups with your surgical team. This does require some life rearrangement, scheduling, and some inconvenience, but after the first year, most of that drops off and you live pretty much untethered. You just take your meds and go about life. The meds, while slightly annoying in terms of side effects, are not all that troublesome. In most cases, people take less then ten pills twice a day. That may sound like a lot, but it really becomes second nature. And with that, you get a tremendous energy and strength boost, no dietary restrictions, no travel restrictions, and usually vastly improved sleep. It's a fantastic treatment option if you can do it.

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