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  1. #1
    public1946
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    Question Phosphorus and potassium in Milk substitutes

    My husband is in late stage 4 but not yet on dialysis. We are not yet working with a dietitian. Does anyone know of a table showing the phosphorus and potassium of milk substitutes (hopefully by brand name)? Some renal recipes call for dairy rich non-dairy creamer. When I checked the USDA database it appears that non dairy creamers are lower in phosphorus than whole milk but actually higher in potassium. It is possible that they vary by brand but of course nutrition labels (in general) donít list phosphorus and potassium. According to the USDA data base, regular soy milk is somewhat lower in phosphorus and potassium than whole milk but still high in potassium. The USDA data base only lists canned rice milk (Rice Dream). Are the nutrients for the canned & boxed product the same? What does it taste like Ė phosphorus and potassium are low but can you really substitute it for milk in recipes?
    "Cooking for David" renal cookbook says to use Vitamite 100 low fat milk substitute. My local grocery store said they couldnít get it because it was discontinued by the manufacturer. It was unclear if this was all Vitamite products or just the low fat. I have emailed Vitamite but not yet received a reply.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    567

    try Rice milk maybe....Rice Dream

    Hi,
    I'm not a dietician. but I do know that Rice Dream is low in phosphates and everything else.

    personally I wouldn't want to use creamer on all my food, most creamers are made from alot of oils that are bad for your heart and would probably give you a heart attack or cholesterol problems if u used them for too long.
    I wouldn't want to drink a quart of cooking oil every day........same goes for creamer.

    But Rice Dream is quite healthy. most dieticians I spoke to though had absolutely no idea what Rice Milk was though.

    but they have 4 or 5 flavours now, vanilla is the nicest, there is a "chocolate" one made from carob and a plain one, also strawberry i think.

    you can find them at any big grocery store.

    i think the website is www.tastethedream.com

    for nutrition info go to:

    http://www.tastethedream.com/media/RDnutri_V.jpg

  3. #3
    CajunSue
    Guest

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by public1946
    My husband is in late stage 4 but not yet on dialysis. We are not yet working with a dietitian. Does anyone know of a table showing the phosphorus and potassium of milk substitutes (hopefully by brand name)? Some renal recipes call for dairy rich non-dairy creamer. When I checked the USDA database it appears that non dairy creamers are lower in phosphorus than whole milk but actually higher in potassium. It is possible that they vary by brand but of course nutrition labels (in general) donít list phosphorus and potassium. According to the USDA data base, regular soy milk is somewhat lower in phosphorus and potassium than whole milk but still high in potassium. The USDA data base only lists canned rice milk (Rice Dream). Are the nutrients for the canned & boxed product the same? What does it taste like Ė phosphorus and potassium are low but can you really substitute it for milk in recipes?
    "Cooking for David" renal cookbook says to use Vitamite 100 low fat milk substitute. My local grocery store said they couldnít get it because it was discontinued by the manufacturer. It was unclear if this was all Vitamite products or just the low fat. I have emailed Vitamite but not yet received a reply.
    I am so glad this was asked, I have really been working hard to learn everything before I start dialysis, I read where you could use Non dairy creamer on ceral. But what brand and where do you find it, I know it can't be that non dairy creamer you have in a jar to put in your coffee, I can't see putting that in ceral. I miss my seral in the mornings..Sue

  4. #4
    dondona
    Guest

    Unhappy hmmm...

    i don't know if you all know this or not but TOMATOE'S and POTATOE'S and EGG'S and BREAD all have phosphorus ..........

  5. #5
    CajunSue
    Guest
    Yep!!! I know, I think if you soak the potatoes for three or four hours before you cook them it takes alot out. And on my diet sheet it says no more then one egg aday. I just miss my ceral and trying to find out what kind of milk I can have on it...I know once I start dialysis I will learn more about our diet and what I can and can't have, I am just trying to get it all together before I start. My brother had his cath put in for home dialysis day before yesterday. He will start in two weeks. It is so strange how both of us have the same health problems and are a year apart. I forgot what his % was but mine is still at 17% and the doc says the goverment will not pay for dialysis until you are at 15 or below. My brother has private insurance right now but will be getting medicare, he also just found out he is anemic and had to have a transfusion and has to have these 800 dollar shots, some type of hormone for his cells, I found out years ago that I would some day have to have dialysis and he finds out just a few months ago that he would have to have it and now he will start treatment before me, I think it is sad that people have to get sicker before the Government will help us.

  6. #6
    penguin2000
    Guest

    Milk Substitutes

    Mocha Mix is an old brand of milk substitute. It comes in fat free as well as original. I've also seen something called vitamite listed in recipes. Hope this helps.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    567
    I think by "creamer" what I was told was to use that coffee rich stuff you find in the fridge at eh grocery store.
    It comes in a plastic bottle or cardboard container- sometimes is frozen i have been told.

    you could still maybe have cereal.
    are you allowed to eat oatmeal?
    I know alot of "normal" people who eat oatmeal cereal with just hot water or cold water even.

    I have even seen people put water and vanilla sugar on cereal instead of milk. I don't think it would be that great, but i am sure it would still be passable.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    166
    Great discussion about milk substitutes -- and wish I had a more comprehensive list to offer but I don't at the moment. We'll add it to our list of "to do" items.

    In the meantime, I suggest that my patients use liquid non-dairy creamer (like the liquid coffeemate found in the dairy case) on their cereal, or the others mentioned here -- Mocha Mix (frozen) or Rice Dream (baking section of grocery), and before reading this and hearing it may be discontinued, VitaMite (milk aisle).

    There is one other new product called Dairy Delicious that you may want to research (non-dairy milk substitute).

    In the meantime - I really like this suggestion - limit the milk you put on your cereal (yes, real milk) to about 1/3 cup, then use a fork to eat the cereal -- leaving the milk behind. That way, you'll be leaving behind some of the phosphorus found in the milk. Do not drink the milk that's left -- just use the very minimal amount you need for your cereal.

    Phosphorus is found in almost every food -- so you'll always be learning ways to moderate the amount you take in -- and once you start dialysis, you'll be given a meal plan to help keep you on track. Good luck for now.

  9. #9
    CajunSue
    Guest

    Post

    Thank you for al your help, I am going to do the 1/3 cup of milk and eat it with a fork and don't drink the milk. That is a very good idea Now I can have my ceral again.Sue

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by CajunSue
    Thank you for al your help, I am going to do the 1/3 cup of milk and eat it with a fork and don't drink the milk. That is a very good idea Now I can have my ceral again.Sue
    Excellent idea!!

    If you use Extra Strength Tums as a binder with meals, it will divert the phosphorus to the bowel instead of the kidneys, and you can increase the amount of phosphorus you consume.

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