Newly diagnosed Stage 3 CKD - Welcome to the myDaVita Kidney Disease and Dialysis Forums

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Newly diagnosed Stage 3 CKD

Page Title Module
Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Newly diagnosed Stage 3 CKD

    Hi Everyone--

    I have just been diagnosed with Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease and hope to communicate with others facing this same disease. I have a lot to learn about what I can do to slow or stop the progression. I am seeking information and support. My next appointment with the nephrologist is December 4th., at which time I'm sure I will have a lot of questions for him. I am hoping that being a member on this site will help me to know what questions I need to ask. Any input will be appreciated. Thank you.

  • #2
    I was stage 3 for over 12 years and it was a major battle to avoid dialysis. I exercised at least for an hour of cardio per day, 1/2 hour strength trained per day, drank 1.25 gallons of water per day and chugged vitamins and minerals by the handful. My GFR hit 16 once and I did a 5 day water fast and it shot back up to 37. But alas it finally fell to stage 5 and I had to go on dialysis. Diet is very important, as well as not being overweight, being physically active, don't take any Non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cut back on your protein intake. Drink lots of pure water. If you are diabetic control your blood glucose levels. Good luck in the future.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Martha I am also stage 3 CKD. This site will be useful. I can say to always get a copy of your blood work. It can help a lot once you get to know what it means. The main things to watch are sodium, potassium, phosphorus, and also make sure you know your GFR and creatinine levels. Your GFR is the number that tells you what stage you are in. (also what percent your kidneys are working). Once you know these numbers you will be able to figure out what to do where diet is concerned. Everyone is different. Even if you are in the same stage your numbers could be different than mine. Make sure at this point to drink plenty of water. Eat a little less protein. Tell your doctor anything medication you take including vitamins and herbal remedies. And when you go to the nephrologist make sure to write down your questions and get answers. I think a lot of doctors don't really want to tell you much. I hope we can both stay at stage 3 as long as possible.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have end stage renal disease. I put myself on the diet on here six months before going on dialysis.My labs are always perfect and I feel good. So the best advice I can offer anyone is to listen to your team members and stick to this diet.....Have been doing this three years. Love and blessings to all

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Loganwon. Thank you for your response. I am sorry that you had to eventually go on dialysis, but I hope you are doing as well as possible. I appreciate your advice. I have a lot to learn yet about diet. Fortunately, I have been quite physically active for many years as a runner and lifting weights. I have been a big protein consumer, but have cut way back on that. I no longer take NSAIDs and have been drinking more water than I ever thought was possible! I am not diabetic and do not have high blood pressure. There is no family history of kidney disease, however, in 2008, I was treated for cancer and received pelvic radiation and chemo. I guess it is not known whether that contributed to the kidney disease or not. One side effect from the radiation may make diet more challenging for me, as I have trouble with fruits and vegetables and have had several episodes of small bowel obstruction. In order for me to tolerate those foods, they must be cooked to the "mush" stage. However, I can do that and know that they will benefit me in fighting CKD.

          Thank you again for your advice and encouragement. I wish you all the best.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi 1scaredycat. Thank you so much for your response. I'm so glad I have found this site. I am also a cancer survivor and have found great support and information on several sites in that regard, so I am hoping to get the same benefit here for my kidney issues. Since I was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, I have volumes of copies of lab results, scans, etc., so I am aware of the importance of getting copies of everything. My nephrologist's office has a patient portal, so everything is easily accessible. As regards diet, I have a lot to learn about what foods to eat more of and what ones to eat less of, such as protein. That will be a challenge for me, as I love to eat! One additional complication for me is being unable to tolerate some fruits and veggies, and any that I can eat must be cooked, not raw, due to radiation-induced intestinal damage and a history of small intestine blockages. I am hoping that when I return to the nephrologist, he or his nurse will give me some good information about diet or refer me to a dietician. I am already compiling a list of questions for him. Fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on how I look at it, I guess my experience with cancer has taught me how to be a well-informed patient. I will research like crazy!

            I wish you all the very best and thank you again for your response. I agree--may we both remain at stage 3 for a long, long time!

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi ginnys. Thank you for responding to my introduction post. I am happy to hear that you are doing well and feeling good. As regards diet, I have not been advised on any significant changes yet, but was told to moderate my intake of protein. I still have a lot to learn! I will be seeing the nephrologist for a follow-up appointment on December 4th., at this time I hope to get a lot more information.

              May you continue to do well. Thanks again.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MarthaP View Post
                Hi Loganwon. Thank you for your response. I am sorry that you had to eventually go on dialysis, but I hope you are doing as well as possible. I appreciate your advice. I have a lot to learn yet about diet. Fortunately, I have been quite physically active for many years as a runner and lifting weights. I have been a big protein consumer, but have cut way back on that. I no longer take NSAIDs and have been drinking more water than I ever thought was possible! I am not diabetic and do not have high blood pressure. There is no family history of kidney disease, however, in 2008, I was treated for cancer and received pelvic radiation and chemo. I guess it is not known whether that contributed to the kidney disease or not. One side effect from the radiation may make diet more challenging for me, as I have trouble with fruits and vegetables and have had several episodes of small bowel obstruction. In order for me to tolerate those foods, they must be cooked to the "mush" stage. However, I can do that and know that they will benefit me in fighting CKD.

                Thank you again for your advice and encouragement. I wish you all the best.
                Thank you for the reply. You sound like you could avoid dialysis for quite awhile. My biggest complaint with the nephrologists that I have seen is that the older ones try to avoid dialysis as long as possible, and the younger nephrologists want to start you on dialysis sooner, because they realize that starting sooner than later preserves some of your remaining kidney function by lightening the load on your kidneys.

                It is strange that before I started dialysis they wanted me to cut back on the protein and drink lots of water, but once I started dialysis they made me double up on the protein and cut the water amount in half.

                Ask your nephrologist for an honest and frank diagnosis concerning how long you can avoid dialysis. Even if you have to some day go on dialysis it is not as bad as some people make it out to be. 5, maybe 6, times each week before I go to bed I plug in a tube that fills my midsection with a solution and removes it for 4 cycles per night while I sleep. The only real adjustment for me was learning to sleep attached to a hose.

                Having to be on dialysis does not mean you did anything wrong. Just like having had cancer does not mean you did anything wrong. I write that because some people, it seems to me, have an attitude that being on dialysis means you failed somehow. Just like people that are diabetic and have to take insulin does not mean they failed. You can't control your genetics, or a lot of other things, that happen to you and I in our lives. I hope the future is bright and happy for you and everyone else. Happy Holidays!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Loganwon. I thank you so much for your response, as it gives me lots of encouragement that I am not headed for dialysis, at least not for quite some time. I appreciate your advice about asking the nephrologist to give me an honest opinion about that. I have already decided that I am going to seek a second opinion from another nephrologist after my follow-up appointment on December 4th. One of the issues I already have with this group of physicians is that my second appointment is with a different physician than the one who did my initial evaluation and ordered the labs. They also have a smaller facility in the town in which I live and I asked them about having my appointments there. They said it would be no problem and that another doctor could see me. I am concerned that continuity of care is not a priority in this practice. However, perhaps this is standard procedure in the specialty of nephrology and I'm just not aware of it. I worked in healthcare for many years and believe continuity of care is very important. So that being said, I just need to get a second opinion to make sure I am comfortable with my doctors and their opinions. I did not do that when I was diagnosed with cancer, but was very fortunate to have wonderful doctors assigned to my case.

                  Since you are on dialysis, are you able to travel at all? Unfortunately, my 91-year old mother lives 600 miles from me in an assisted living home and has dementia. I go there every 3 months or more often as necessary to check on her and make sure all of her needs are met. So how does that happen when a person is on dialysis? I know I do not need to worry about that right now, but I am just curious.

                  I agree that blaming oneself for this disease or other diseases is a waste of time, energy and emotion. Sometimes things just happen. I thank you for your support and good advice and hope that we will stay in touch on this site. Enjoy your holidays and know that I wish you peace, happiness and the best health possible in the year ahead.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MarthaP View Post
                    Hi Everyone--

                    I have just been diagnosed with Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease and hope to communicate with others facing this same disease. I have a lot to learn about what I can do to slow or stop the progression. I am seeking information and support. My next appointment with the nephrologist is December 4th., at which time I'm sure I will have a lot of questions for him. I am hoping that being a member on this site will help me to know what questions I need to ask. Any input will be appreciated. Thank you.
                    I'm new to all of this as well, Nice to meet you!

                    Comment

                    Back to Top
                    Working...
                    X