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  • #16
    I also think you can learn a lot in those 90 days about what kind of response you can expect. You can observe other people and their similar issues - how they deal with people who call in sick, etc. I agree you should be careful - you just never know what might happen to change your situation. Don't forget after 1 year you have FMLA rights, etc. But for now, congratulations.

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    • #17
      hey everyone im going to school for medical assistant and i will training in january. and i wanted to know if this a good place to do my clinicals in january?

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      • #18
        Hi there. I just had my transplant on 7/16 and returned to work 3 days ago. I must admit, the return was MUCH harder than I thought. I was immediately thrown in to 12+ hour work days and am already exhausted! Anybody out there that can give me advice?? Will my energy level get easier, or is this my new reality? I dont want to disappoint my employer, who up until now, has been execellent to me throught my illness.

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        • #19
          It has been only three months. I though I read somewhere that it would take up to 6 months to get the energy and feel real good again.
          Glad to hear from you. I was wondering how you were doing. I just finished transplant tests and was put on the list 9/25. Take care of yourself and get plenty of sleep if you are working 12 hours. Your employer is unrealistic although I am sure your are thankful for the time she/he gave you off.

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          • #20
            KCRAMER-Congrats on getting listed! I obviously know what a long process it is. I know this will raise new hopes and concerns, but I can honestly say I would do it all over again (although I really hope I dont have to for a long time-LOL). I am indeed grateful for the time off, so just looking forward to resting a lot on the weekends. I think getting use to the medications is part of the struggle, as they change them almost weekly (based on labs). When your time comes, I can give you advice on which ones pset the bowels, etc...I REALLY know a lot about that now.

            God Bless and thank you for your thoughts and kind responses.

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            • #21
              I've been on dialysis for 5 years and have been doing home hemo for 3 of those years. I can certainly understand needing to work while in ESRD and undergoing dialysis treatments but, honestly, does anyone here really think it wise to put themselves in a position where if something went wrong NO ONE would know what may be happening? I know finding a job and being up front about our ailments is most likely going to result in not getting the job but with the ease of very bad situations regarding our health surfacing quickly and sometimes often it's something that I am wary of. No, you don't have to inform regarding your health but I just can not put myself in that position. I'm not trying to chastise anyone for working and/or not telling their employer. I just know that before ESRD I trained horses and while I know that is a way more physically demanding job that can put me in situations which most occupations would not, I still feel that when working and having ESRD/dialysis treatments you owe it to yourself to make sure that in the event of a bad situation at least one person, other than yourself, could at the least warn any emergency care givers of our current issues.

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              • #22
                I began training for HHD, and with it began hemodialysis in July 2012. I notified only my manager of my situation and 16 months later I have informed one other member of my department of my medical and disability status. As in individual with ESRD I am part of a protected class of employees covered by the ADA (Americans With Disabilities Act). As such, my employer is obligated to afford me "reasonable accomodations" for my disability.

                As an HHD patient those accomodations would certainly include the monthly clinics I must attend at my HHD clinic to review my treatment sheets, my nutritional values, general health and social welfare. That review is conducted by a dialysis nurse familiar with my case, my nephrologist, my social worker and my dietician. Another accomodation could be mimimizing the frequency of short notice overnight/multinight business travel.

                During the past year, I have engaged in countless overnight/multinight business travel, much of it short notice. In all instances I was able to stay on my 5X weekly HHD treatment schedule. In some cases, doing so required precise planning and execution, e.g. working from home in the AM while dialyzing in preparation for a PM flight, or late night arrival from air travel and beginning a nocturnal HHD treatment starting around 10:00 pm, and then going to work the next day. To reduce those kinds of home treatment scheduling challenges during the past 6 months, I've used my HHD clinic's social worker to set up after hours in-center treatments in the cities where I do business.

                I agree that at least one individual at work should be aware of one's ESRD condition and need for hemodialysis - in the event that special medical circumstances arise. Otherwise, I see the workplace knowledge of the condition on a purely "need to know" basis.

                In my case, my hours in the office haven't changed (avg 9.5 hrs/day up to 11 hrs/day) and similar regularity and extent of business travel as before beginning HHD. I've been able to do all that I did in work and play before HHD thanks to a flexible and effective treatment modality, a competent and supportive health care team, my outstanding care partner/wife and lastly an understanding supervisor.
                Last edited by stumpr54; 11-03-2013, 11:40 AM.

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                • #23
                  I started in-center dialysis (via fistula) October 1. So far, I am working a 40 hour work week and then going in for dialysis after work. My normal time is 6:30 pm and I am on for 3 3/4 hours. Most of the time I get called in early (as early as 5 pm). I can say it is a lot. I go Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Obviously those three days are work and dialysis and bed. It is an adjustment, but I look at it as I am giving up those three days so I can live better the other four.

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                  • #24
                    Hello rickster12,

                    Working full time and doing in-center hemodialyis is a pretty demanding gig. I never considered in-center hemo and selected home hemodialysis for my modality more than a year before I began HHD training in July 2012 and then began HHD at home in September 2012. I have a willing and capable care partner in my spouse of 36 years and a great medical support team. I have done in-center when I've been traveling for business for more than 3 days and need to treat to stay on my 5X per week schedule. I find the modality remarkably empowering and it fulfills my natural drive to do it myself. As I've noted in prior posts, the weekly treatment scheduling flexibility between nocturnal and daily treatments and the control over those treatments, e.g. developing buttonhole sites, placing my own needles and determining what I am going to do during my nearly 3 hour daily treatments - pay bills, work on the computer, watch our TV shows, listen to music, read, etc. help make the up to 20 hour per week part time job all the more satisfying.

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                    • #25
                      While I have a lot of good friends and people in my life, a full time care giver is not an option for me. I don't mind the in facility dialysis as it forces me to relax a little bit as I tend to "go,go go!" Though I am seriously considering next year going on disability and looking for something part-time (not too much pay of course). The job and dialysis is too much,. I wanted to see how it went for a few months before making any decisions like that. However I go on Jan. 22 for the tests to go on the transplant list and I have a bunch of family/friends who have volunteered to be tested to see if they are a match. I am going to first see if any are before doing it as obviously if one is then I won't be needing the disability other than the rehab time.

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                      • #26
                        There are many DaVita dialysis centers that offer nocturnal hemodialysis. That may be a better option for you 3 days a week than the scheduling demands and late evenings of traditional in-center treatments. There are also centers that are open on Saturdays, permitting you to treat Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday and providing you with one less midweek treatment. Before I was trained to perform nocturnal treatments at home, I was taking my 2 days off per week (5X weekly treatment schedule) duirng the work week to reduce the "rush" factor to complete a treatment each night before bed. We went through a fair number of treatments that didn't conclude until after 10:30 pm and was lucky to get to bed my 11:30 pm - about 1-1/2 hours after my preferred work week bed time. Nocturnal HHD provides even more treatment flexibility as I can "dial up" the dialysate volume from my normal 30 L to 40 L and then on the next day do a 20 L daily treatment, giving me more time at night and still get to bed at a reasonable hour. Your situation makes me appreciate my care partner/spouse all the more. At my 59 years of age I don't think I could hack my 45 to 55 hour per week job and in-center dialysis 3 days per week.

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                        • #27
                          The good thing about my job is my boss understands my circumstances and I just do the 40 hours. I was originally on a Tuesday, Thursday,Saturday schedule but at 6:30 AM. I would then work a late shift on the two days. I chose to go the M, W, F route as it frees up my weekends.

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                          • #28
                            I'm not on peritoneal dialysis, but I returned to work at the end of May after being out 8 months on sick leave. Fortunately, I had enough leave saved up to cover me during my absence, and my supervisor was very understanding of my condition, but I was adamant that I would return to work. I currently work only 2 days a week (on my non-dialysis days), but hope that will change in September. I feel a great sense of accomplishment and fulfillment by returning to work. It gives me a sense of normalcy back to my life.

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                            • #29
                              Tank0219, that is great that you were able to go back to work! It's great to back some sense of "normalcy" and makes you feel better because you have something else to focus on. I switched to Peritoneal Dialysis a few months ago and it has helped greatly with giving me more time for work and personal time. Previously I was doing in center treatments and still trying to work full time. It was tough, but I wanted to keep working. At least now I don't feel so exhausted with everything. Good luck to you and hope you'll be able to work more in the future.

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