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Why the doctor recommends more protein?

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  • Why the doctor recommends more protein?

    My dad still has some function in his kidney and he produces urine. The doctors are saying he needs more protein? Does that seem strange? I thought protein should be limited for esrd? How much protein does an average person need? Doesn't make any sense to me. They are not even specific as to how many grams of protein he should have. Should I be concerned? Thankyou.

  • #2
    Re: Why the doctor recommends more protein?

    jenny, how much kidney function does he have? How much protein was he consuming everyday before the doctor suggested an increase in protein? It could be that he was getting anemic due to too low of protein in his diet. We do need protein for cell repair, and it could be that there are other issues going on that are more important for other organs.

    You asked, "How much protein does a person need?" Well, of course it depends on the person and their current health but from what I understand even a healthy person with no kidney issues should consume no more than 6 oz a day of meat, and then add that to certain grams of protein from other sources (breads, nuts, cheese, milk, etc). It's not a whole lot that a healthy person should consume; so given that a kidney patient should consume considerably less.

    ----------------------------------THIS YOU DIDN'T ASK FOR-------:O)-----------------------------------

    Our society has gone overboard with food, period! I'm in my middle 50's and I can remember when I was growing up that it was inconceivable to think about consuming more than one small piece of meat. We had lots and lots of vegetables (no less than 4 at each nighttime meal). Now a days, forget it! My husband and I served our children a meat and two vegetables, a starch, and fruit. That is even considerably less than I had growing up but the portions probably would equal out to the same. We do live in a meat and potatoes society now and it's no wonder the kidneys are having a hard time making it! Now that I am on the kidney diet, I am back to eating the four veggies a day and a very small piece of meat.
    Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease, 17% renal function, 11 years
    *Non diabetic *Non dialysis
    High Blood Pressure, controlled


    "Never be afraid to trust an unknown future to a known God."
    ~Corrie ten Boom

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    • #3
      Re: Why the doctor recommends more protein?

      It would depend on his albumin and total protien levels. One of the big indicators of poor survival rate is a low protien count. Additionally it is likely that he is spilling protien rather than processing it through his kidneys so if the dr says more protien then he likely needs it. I used whey protien isolate powder to maintain a decent albumin level because it is far lower in phosphorous the meat protein

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      • #4
        Re: Why the doctor recommends more protein?

        It is Probably would depend on his albumin and total protien levels, we need the protein to repair the cells and continue the blood circulation in the normal state as well as keep healthy and it is important for us Getting Pregnant Fast | Tips To Get Pregnant Fast

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        • #5
          In Rich snyder's book, titled WHAT YOU MUST KNOW ABOUT KIDNEY DISEASE, as an example he says, a 150 pound person should get 55 grams of protein. He also has a formula in the book. This is a very good book to start out with, with a lot of information. Although he does not believe in ANIMAL PROTEIN..

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CONNIE MARIE View Post
            In Rich snyder's book, titled WHAT YOU MUST KNOW ABOUT KIDNEY DISEASE, as an example he says, a 150 pound person should get 55 grams of protein. He also has a formula in the book. This is a very good book to start out with, with a lot of information. Although he does not believe in ANIMAL PROTEIN..
            Connie,

            I attended a seminar where a nephrologist suggested the following:
            http://www.baakp.org/Newsletters/Kid...ons_May_09.pdf
            There are things you can do to try and delay the progression
            of kidney disease. Keeping your blood pressure under control
            is key; especially by using an ACE-inhibitor type of blood pressure medicine with “pril” as the suffix.
            Know your lab test results and try to keep your hemoglobin A1C under 7.0%, your
            blood pressure under 130/80, your bad cholesterol less than
            100, and eat no more than 0.08 gms/kg body weight of any
            type of protein per day.
            A proper diet is another way to slow
            the progression of diabetes and kidney disease. The website
            www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search can help you find out
            what the foods you are eating have in them.

            Vivek Bhalla, M.D.,
            Stanford University Medical Center
            Division of Nephrology
            Of course each patient should consult with their dr and/or dietitians before making any changes in diet and/or meds.
            I received the GIFT OF LIFE on Nov 9, 2010 thanks to my wonderful donor Laura and her family!

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