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  • Sodium vs Potassium

    When it comes to buying stock (beef or chicken) - which should I be most concerned about ? The sodium content or the potassium content? I like to have some stock in the pantry as I don't always have homemade stock in the freezer.

  • #2
    I am not sure which would be more important...It depends on your numbers. If you have high potassium numbers and high blood pressure both would be bad. You just need to figure it into your diet intake of each. I buy an organic chicken broth and beef( I believe the brand is pacific) But it is the lowest sodium I have found and I haven't found it to have any added potassium content. It is all organic and it actually tastes really good. Sorry I know that really doesn't answer your question but it has worked for me.

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    • #3
      You need to check with your dietician/nephrologist. Patients on peritoneal "may" require more potassium, which is why you need to check with professionals. May I suggest you check into Swanson no salt broths (beef & chicken). The chicken has 45 mg of sodium per cup and it's actually pretty tasty.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Connidale View Post
        When it comes to buying stock (beef or chicken) - which should I be most concerned about ? The sodium content or the potassium content? I like to have some stock in the pantry as I don't always have homemade stock in the freezer.
        The sodium is quickly eliminated from your body. So if you get too much sodium you can get rid of some of it by increasing your water intake or working up a good sweat. Sodium can raise your blood pressure. Potassium on the other hand is much more dangerous. Too high a potassium level and your heart beat goes extremely high or it just spasms. Let me put it like this; too high a level of potassium can kill you. Too low a level of potassium is bad also but you can quickly raise your potassium levels up, but to lower your potassium levels requires medication and some times hospitalization.

        If your labs come back with high levels of potassium, which can be caused by taking ACE inhibitors for example, your Dr will tell you to come in right away or go to the hospital, I know I had that problem many years ago, too much potassium makes all of your muscles very weak.
        Last edited by Loganwon; 01-17-2016, 02:39 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 1scaredycat View Post
          I am not sure which would be more important...It depends on your numbers. If you have high potassium numbers and high blood pressure both would be bad. You just need to figure it into your diet intake of each. I buy an organic chicken broth and beef( I believe the brand is pacific) But it is the lowest sodium I have found and I haven't found it to have any added potassium content. It is all organic and it actually tastes really good. Sorry I know that really doesn't answer your question but it has worked for me.
          The 2 main numbers that the nephrologists look at in your labs are your potassium levels and phosphorus levels. Too much potassium can blow your heart to pieces and too high phosphorus levels pulls calcium from your bones and makes them brittle. See these are some of the effects of bad kidneys.

          Your kidneys signal your bones to make red blood cells, regulate electrolytes such as calcium, sodium, potassium, and, phosphorus. Kidneys filter out protein and get rid of creatinine and regulate nitrogen ratios. Dialysis does not do all of those things and that is why people on dialysis die faster then people with healthy kidneys.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Loganwon View Post
            ......

            If your labs come back with high levels of potassium, which can be caused by taking ACE inhibitors for example, your Dr will tell you to come in right away or go to the hospital, I know I had that problem many years ago, too much potassium makes all of your muscles very weak.
            Or, in my case, the nephrologist had me "flush myself out" with 3 bottles of some stuff that tasted like cherry favor mixed with beach sand. Removed a good bit of potassium overnight, but kinda ruined my schedule for a day or so......

            And, yes, back just before I started dialysis, my elevated potassium levels DID make me very weak. Also gave me headaches.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dac0214 View Post
              Or, in my case, the nephrologist had me "flush myself out" with 3 bottles of some stuff that tasted like cherry favor mixed with beach sand. Removed a good bit of potassium overnight, but kinda ruined my schedule for a day or so......

              And, yes, back just before I started dialysis, my elevated potassium levels DID make me very weak. Also gave me headaches.
              Yes I had to take Kionex which I think is similar to what you had to drink; it was peach flavored beach sand. yuck.

              But it worked pretty much overnight also.

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              • #8
                I also had to take the awful beach sand stuff to lower my potassium it got to 6 which is very dangerous. I am not on dialysis as of now but my Kt got really high twice in the last year. The first time we had a hard time finding the med but my husband finally found it and we had to get the entire jar. the second time I already had it so it was really easy after taking it for 3 days my Kt went down. I have been really careful with Kt foods and now it is staying down better. So potassium is a lot more dangerous than sodium. I was almost admitted the second time so beware. The last time was when my urine protein went even higher and would not go down and I did Rituxan which helped all my labs.

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                • #9
                  My husband has just started on this renal diet. He was told we needed to lower his potassium level, among other things. When reading labels it's not difficult to find the sodium content but I am finding often times the potassium content is not listed. I am assuming a low sodium would also mean low potassium - is that correct?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sandyhotz View Post
                    My husband has just started on this renal diet. He was told we needed to lower his potassium level, among other things. When reading labels it's not difficult to find the sodium content but I am finding often times the potassium content is not listed. I am assuming a low sodium would also mean low potassium - is that correct?
                    Hi sandyhotz, have you used the Food Analyzer tool yet? You can access it here: http://diethelper.davita.com/food-analyzer. It's part of the DaVita Diet Helper and is a great resource to find the potassium and other nutritional content in foods. I hope this helps!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sandyhotz View Post
                      My husband has just started on this renal diet. He was told we needed to lower his potassium level, among other things. When reading labels it's not difficult to find the sodium content but I am finding often times the potassium content is not listed. I am assuming a low sodium would also mean low potassium - is that correct?
                      No that is not right--look every food up, unfortunately potassium levels are not required on labels and they should be.

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