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Understanding blood test symbols and their meanings.

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  • Understanding blood test symbols and their meanings.

    I AM TRYING TO UNDERSTAND WHAT ALL THE ABBREVIATIONS MEAN ON THESE BLOOD TEST SO I CAN BETTER MANAGE MY CKD. IS THERE A LIST OF THESE CODES AND WHAT THEY MEAN SOME WHERE? THANK FOR YOUR HELP. JRG

  • #2
    Hi Janice
    The main ones you need to watch are sodium,phosphorus, potassium, BUN, Creatinine. The sodium, phosphorus and potassium you have some control over. Here is an overview of some medical abbreviations. Not all of these will be on your kidney blood work. Common Blood Test Abbreviations

    • ALT - Alanine Transaminase (part of liver function test)
    • ANA - Antinuclear Antibody (part of liver function test)
    • AST - Alanine Aminotransferase (part of liver function test)
    • BAC - Blood Alcohol Concentration
    • BMP - Basic Metabolic Panel (a group of tests)
    • BNP - Beta Natriuretic Peptide (testing for congestive heart failure)
    • BUN - Blood Urea Nitrogen (part of kidney function test)
    • CA - Calcium (test blood calcium levels)
    • CBC - Complete Blood Count (test red and white blood cells)
    • CK - Creatine Phosphokinase (test for muscle damage)
    • CR - Creatinine (part of kidney function test)
    • ESR - Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (tests for inflammation)
    • HCT - Hematocrit (part of the CBC test)
    • HDL/LDL - High Density Lipoproteins/High Density Lipoproteins (testing for good and bad cholesterol)
    • INR - International Normalized Ratio (blood clotting test)
    • K - Potassium (test for potassium levels)
    • Mg - Magnesium (test for magnesium levels)
    • Na - Sodium (test for sodium levels)
    • PSA - Prostate Specific Antigen (prostate cancer test)
    • PT - Prothrombin Time (test blood clotting)
    • RBC - Red Blood Cell Count (part of the CBC test)
    • TPO - Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (test for antibodies to thyroid)
    • Trig - Triglygerides (part of cholesterol test)
    • TSH - Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (one of the main tests of a thyroid test)
    • WBC - White Blood Cell Count (part of the CBC test)

    Blood tests are one of a doctor's basic tools to check your health. Many specialized tests are available. For clarification on blood test abbreviations other than those listed above just ask your medical professional.








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    • #3
      Originally posted by 1scaredycat View Post
      Hi Janice
      The main ones you need to watch are sodium,phosphorus, potassium, BUN, Creatinine. The sodium, phosphorus and potassium you have some control over. Here is an overview of some medical abbreviations. Not all of these will be on your kidney blood work. Common Blood Test Abbreviations

      • ALT - Alanine Transaminase (part of liver function test)
      • ANA - Antinuclear Antibody (part of liver function test)
      • AST - Alanine Aminotransferase (part of liver function test)
      • BAC - Blood Alcohol Concentration
      • BMP - Basic Metabolic Panel (a group of tests)
      • BNP - Beta Natriuretic Peptide (testing for congestive heart failure)
      • BUN - Blood Urea Nitrogen (part of kidney function test)
      • CA - Calcium (test blood calcium levels)
      • CBC - Complete Blood Count (test red and white blood cells)
      • CK - Creatine Phosphokinase (test for muscle damage)
      • CR - Creatinine (part of kidney function test)
      • ESR - Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (tests for inflammation)
      • HCT - Hematocrit (part of the CBC test)
      • HDL/LDL - High Density Lipoproteins/High Density Lipoproteins (testing for good and bad cholesterol)
      • INR - International Normalized Ratio (blood clotting test)
      • K - Potassium (test for potassium levels)
      • Mg - Magnesium (test for magnesium levels)
      • Na - Sodium (test for sodium levels)
      • PSA - Prostate Specific Antigen (prostate cancer test)
      • PT - Prothrombin Time (test blood clotting)
      • RBC - Red Blood Cell Count (part of the CBC test)
      • TPO - Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (test for antibodies to thyroid)
      • Trig - Triglygerides (part of cholesterol test)
      • TSH - Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (one of the main tests of a thyroid test)
      • WBC - White Blood Cell Count (part of the CBC test)

      Blood tests are one of a doctor's basic tools to check your health. Many specialized tests are available. For clarification on blood test abbreviations other than those listed above just ask your medical professional.







      Thanks for providing such a thorough response!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Janice67 View Post
        I AM TRYING TO UNDERSTAND WHAT ALL THE ABBREVIATIONS MEAN ON THESE BLOOD TEST SO I CAN BETTER MANAGE MY CKD. IS THERE A LIST OF THESE CODES AND WHAT THEY MEAN SOME WHERE? THANK FOR YOUR HELP. JRG
        Hi Janice67, welcome to myDaVita and thank you for reaching out here! I'd also recommend asking someone at your center what the abbreviations mean, I'm sure they will be able to assist you! Have a great day.

        Comment


        • #5
          Davita needs to Provide examples. E.g., "limit protein to 10% of calories per day". Explain with an example how to calculate this. Is that protein calories? or grams of meat for the number of calories per day? Davita needs to clarify, be explicit.
          BUT the website has a broken link. The "contact us" link leads to an invalid page. PLEASE TELL DAVITA ABOUT THIS.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Raffman. Thanks for your suggestion. We are unable to replicate the problem you are having with the contact form. If you send me a message through the myDaVita message system I can give you a call to trouble shoot.

            We have several protein articles on DaVita.com you may find helpful..
            Dietary Protein and Chronic Kidney Disease: https://www.davita.com/kidney-diseas...disease/e/5302
            Protein: How Much Should Dialysis Patients Eat? https://www.davita.com/kidney-diseas...ts-eat?/e/7973

            The amount of protein is individualized for each person based on stage of CKD or dialysis type, body size, nutritional status and other considerations. For this reason we do not provide a blanket recommendation for a protein limit. Lower protein diets have been linked to protein-energy malnutrition, and it's important to work with your doctor and dietitian to determine your protein goal and to monitor the impact it has on your health. They will determine the grams or protein per day (this is the nutritional grams provided by each food--for example the amount you find on a food label), and the dietitian can provide an eating plan that specifies how many ounces of meat and servings of other foods that have protein to include each day. In general, 1 ounce of meat or cheese or 1 egg provides 7 grams of protein, 8 ounces of milk provides 8 grams, yogurt varies greatly between regular and Greek yogurt, a serving of vegetables provide 1-2 grams, a serving of bread, cereal or starchy foods provide 1-3 grams. DaVita Diet Helper https://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diethelper has a Meal Planner and Tracker you can use to enter foods and see how much protein in a food, a meal or a daily menu plan.

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